Tasmanian fly fishing report – December 24, 2018

Mayflies and gum beetles have been the theme of December so far, along with sub-tropical low pressure systems and lots of easterlies! This has meant lots of rain in the east, and really good flows (sometimes too high!) down the two Esk rivers, and the granite streams. Snowflake caddis falls have been brilliant. The Mersey has also seen big rises most weeks, and has fished best on rising-levels and featured morning and late afternoon hatches. Brumbys on the otherhand has had great levels, but was slow for Simone and I the other day, with little insect or fish movement during a short drift (once again this can be common during periods of lower pressure troughs). Our highlight has been the creeks, with some great fish coming to the dry fly (modified Coachman and Bruisers Bugs).

Peter and I spent a morning in the Western Lakes chasing tails this week, and found fish tailing for tadpoles, and more than happy to take a dry. The gum beetles from earlier in the month have slowed down, but there are plenty of duns and still the odd stonefly. We’d say that water levels in the back lakes are slightly higher than normal for early Summer, and the fish condition is great with an excellent mix of younger and older prime fish; Most of the older, potentially slabby fish have died off during the last winter which had harsher than normal spawning conditions so we are set for a good few seasons of fish size.

On the hydro lakes Little Pine and Woods are producing consistently with good hatches and great fish, while Pine Tier and Penstock have been popular on the windy days. Great Lake has been tough in the easterly weather, but fish condition and levels are good. Arthurs has even been producing fish in patches, all in excellent condition.

A big thanks to all of our customers new and old, and have a very happy Christmas and New Year. Dan, Simone and the RiverFly team.

Looking for rises, Brumbys Creek

 

 

 

 

Rainy days and dry flies – Tasmanian fly fishing

We are lucky to have had plenty of rain in Tassie, and plenty of high rivers currently (summer should be great!). The wetter days have seen lots of tannin in many of the streams, but this has brought on the best dry fly fishing of the season. With a hint of blood-red tannin, the trout have been rising confidently to large dries (such as our Bruisers Bugs), as well as the usual favourites of Glister Tags, 1864 Scruffys and Fastwater Duns. We’ve had plenty of tricky days with the weather (two tornadoes were seen outside of Launceston today), but we’ve also had plenty of days with 30+ dry fly takes. Get amongst it!

Tasmanian fly fishing, high river levels

Fly fishing Tasmania hatch chart – 27/08/2018

Fly Fishing Tasmania Hatch Chart – 27 August 2018

The Tasmanian fly fishing season has been off and racing for a couple weeks now. Typical of most seasons, opening week featured some solid fishing to Four Springs trout feeding hard on jollytails (galaxia), and the Western Lakes gave us some great trout for those hardy enough to brave the cold. The rivers had a predictably slower start, but we’ve seen baetids and black spinner duns sparingly hatching on some of our favourite creeks and streams already. Flood fishing has seen a couple of exceptional days, particularly in bigger north-west rivers, where RiverFly guide Peter Broomhall managed these spectacular shots of earthworm feeders up to 4lbs!

Quick rundown:

Four Springs: Frogs are imminent, good fishing in close on galaxias feeders during overcast conditions

Tooms: Low, challenging but fish to 6lbs

Great Lake: Good condition fish in amongst the ice! Galaxia feeders on the rocky shores.

Nineteen Lagoons: Very cold, fish still recovering condition

Derwent: Sea runners are starting to show

Mersey and Meander: tough with cold water levels, but fishable.

St Patricks: Good water conditions in the river and tribs, very cold water temps

South Esk: Dropping to a good height over the next few days, expect fish actively nymphing any day.

North Coast: Black back salmon are in the estuaries’, heaps of fun on the fly.

What to expect: Mayfly will start moving over the next fortnight on the lowland streams, while frogtime will hit the highlands. Fish hunting spawning galaxia are also expected this fortnight, look for wave-beaten and rocky shorelines.

 

Fly fishing with RiverFly 1864

Guided fly fishing Tasmania with RiverFly 1864

Guided fly fishing

Trout fishing Tasmania report – August

A wild rainbow on The Earthworm fly.

The Tasmanian season is well into a third week, and the fishing has been great. Well-timed rains on opening day produced brilliant flood-fishing on some of the smaller lakes, with RiverFly customers managing two days’ with double-digit catches. Even cooler is that many of these fish took the dry, including the 1864 Fastwater Dun. Among other lakes Bronte, Four Springs, Penstock, Woods and Lake Leake have all been fishing well, with Fuzzle Buggers, 1864 Earthworm, stick caddis and Fur Flies doing well.  Over in the north-west, Talbots Lagoon has also been popular, but the usual late run of spawning fish has only just finished. A few more weeks till this water really fires.

The streams have also had a good start, and the headwaters of the Esk have been producing clear water and dry fly action, while the top of the Meander, Liffey and St Pats have produced good nymphing. Lower down and the Mersey is patchy on nymphs, the Meander above Deloraine is going well despite high water, and whitebait is starting to show at the mouth of quite a few estuaries. Fly of the week has been our blue nymph, affectionally nicknamed the ‘Silver Bullet’.

Over the coming fortnight expect frogs to show up at Four Springs and Talbots, galaxia feeders on the rocks at Tooms and in the highlands, and some serious pre-hatch nymph action on the streams.

Tip: Target smaller lakes immediately after the next heavy rain. With the ground already saturated, earthworms will begin to wash down gutters and drains, mixing with frogs to create some great edgewater action.

Frog time is almost here! Pic by Peter Broomhall.

 

Fly Fishing Tasmania – March hoppers!

March fly fishing has got off to a great start in Tasmania, with clear and warm days, and lots of terrestrials. Hoppers, willow grubs and free-drifting mayfly nymphs have been driving the river fishing, and the 1864 Mini-WMD Hopper and Ostrich Herl Nymph have been two of the best flies. The Esk rivers, Mersey, Tyenna and Meander have all been fishing very well.

Little Pine and Penstock have featured some brilliant mayfly hatches late in the day, with Shaving Brush style flies doing very well. Further off the beaten track and the Western Lakes have had some good midge hatches, and enough mayfly to keep the fish looking up. Juvenile baitfish, gum beetles and the first jassid falls of autumn have also kept the fish moving!

What’s new in-store: Checkout our specials page for some end of summer bargains, including rods, reels and women’s gear up to 50% off. https://riverfly.com.au/product-category/specials/

Image: RiverFly 1864 Western Lakes customer Dan L. hooked up to an evening tailer (pic by Peter Broomhall).

Western Lakes trout